Twenty Four Hours A Day January 16th

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Brock
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Twenty Four Hours A Day January 16th

Post by Brock »

Saturday, January 16
Thought for the Day

The A.A. program is more a way of building a new life than just a way of getting over drinking, because in A.A. we don't just stop drinking. We did that plenty of times in the old days when we "went on the wagon." And, of course, we always started to drink again because we were only waiting for the time when we could fall off. Once we've got sober through the A.A. program, we start going uphill. In our drinking days, we were going downhill, getting worse and worse. We either go down or up. Am I going uphill, getting better and better?

Meditation for the Day

I will try to obey God's will day in and day out, in the wilderness plains as well as on the mountaintops of experience. It is in the daily strivings that perseverance counts. I believe that God is Lord of little things, the Divine Controller of little happenings. I will persevere in this new way of life. I know that nothing in the day is too small to be part of God's scheme.

Prayer for the Day

I pray that the little stones that I put into the mosaic of my life may make a worthwhile pattern. I pray that I may persevere and so find harmony and beauty.


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DaveP1951
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Re: Twenty Four Hours A Day January 16th

Post by DaveP1951 »

We did that plenty of times in the old days when we "went on the wagon.
My curiosity as to where the phrase "on the wagon" came from got the better of me so I googled it and found these two explanations:
"An American Sally Army Web site says firmly that: “Former National Commander Evangeline Booth — founder William Booth's daughter — drove a hay wagon through the streets of New York to encourage alcoholics on board for a ride back to The Salvation Army. Hence, alcoholics in recovery were said to be "on the wagon”.
And another explanation is:
"During the times of Prohibition in the 19th century, men often climbed onto these wagons and took an oath they would give up alcohol and drink only water. This gave rise to the expression "to be on the water cart/wagon;" it was later shortened to "on the wagon."

As the above quote from the reading say's "And, of course, we always started to drink again, because we were only waiting for the time when we could fall off." There used to be a frequently heard statement in AA meetings. It went, "Being on the wagon is just a form of transportation between drunks."
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